Dear Vice Chancellor…..


2nd March 2018

Dear Vice Chancellor

You may have been alerted by the Alumni Office to a tweet I posted about 48 hours ago (@lizmorrish). In it I announced that I feel so strongly about management’s treatment of staff at Leeds that I will no longer be contributing to the alumni fund. To date, that tweet has reached 36,500 engagements and seems to have encouraged other donors to follow suit at Leeds, as well as at other universities.

The tweet was sent in response to a notification received by striking UCU members at the university informing them that they are likely to face a 25% pay deduction for continuing to take industrial action short of a strike, and in particular, if they fail to reschedule classes missed on strike days within an unreasonably short time. As the UCU letter details, this is effectively penalising strikers twice: once for the strike, and a second time for not doing the work you have not paid them for.

I consider this not just unfair, but bullying and abusive. It follows the serious breakdown in goodwill caused by the university management’s wish, in 2016/2017, to impose an update to Statute VII, adding a clause for dismissal of an employee ‘for some other substantial reason’.

The current strikes are taking place because academics are facing insecure, temporary contracts, potentially capricious reasons for dismissal, and now, the prospect of an insecure future in retirement. I understand, then, that many have reached the limits of their tolerance and have decided to withdraw their labour.

I am not in a position to withdraw labour, but I am in a position to withdraw my support for the alumni fund. It must be over a decade since a third year student called Charlotte phoned me in the evening from the alumni office. I was delighted to receive the call because I have always been grateful for the free education I received at Leeds all the way to PhD. In the era of tuition fees, I had begun to feel uncomfortable about the intergenerational inequity of imposing debt on young people just so they could access their right to education. I was teaching in another university and felt I could not face a classroom full of students without contributing something, somewhere to alleviate this unfairness. I take that obligation to contribute very seriously even to the point of having bequeathed my body to a local medical school after my death. I was a push-over, and Charlotte signed me up to a monthly donation and we moved on to talking about her dissertation. As we hung up from the conversation, Charlotte said she wished I was her seminar tutor. That made me feel very warm towards current students at Leeds.

Since leaving full time employment my gifts have become less regular, but I am still willing to donate, especially when I read articles in the alumni magazine such as the recent brilliant explanation of a new cancer treatment, or inspiring stories of students who have benefitted from scholarships.

Because I feel such a commitment to current students and research at Leeds, I have done my best to persuade other alumni to donate as well, with some success. However, I feel equally strongly about decent treatment for talented, highly qualified staff that does not deny them dignity or the salary and pension they have earned. I cannot in all conscience contribute to what will probably be another metric, another KPI that feeds into yet another league table. Please be assured that I am willing to use these arguments in conversations with other alumni donors. I will post this open letter to my blog and to Twitter, and I can only hope that reason, and whatever powers of persuasion I can bring, will result in you rescinding threats to penalize your staff in such a shameful way. Until that point, I’m afraid my philanthropic association with the university is suspended.

Yours Sincerely,


Liz Morrish

BA Linguistics and Phonetics, 1982

Ph.D. Phonetics 1985


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